Charges Involving Property of Another

Theft & Shoplifting:

Washington State does not have separate crimes for theft and shoplifting since shoplifting is just theft from a store. While “shoplifting” does not sound like it would be a serious crime, it can result in a felony conviction that can cause life-long consequences. Additionally, those convicted of theft are required to pay back the business.

Under Washington law, the severity and punishment of a theft charge generally depends on the value of the items stolen.

  1. Theft 1st degree: The total amount of property or services taken is more than $5,000 or any property taken from another person.
    1. Theft 1st degree is a Class B felony and is punishable up to 10 years in jail and a $20,000 fine.
  2. Theft 2nd degree: The total amount of property or services taken is more than $750 or any property taken from another person.
    1. Theft 2st degree is a Class C felony and is punishable up to 5 years in jail and a $10,000 fine.
  3. Theft 3rd degree: The total amount of property or services taken is more than $750 or any property taken from another person.
    1. Theft 3rd degree is a Gross Misdemeanor and is punishable up to 1 year in jail and a $5,000 fine.

Theft Charges Involving Vehicles & Firearms

Washington law treats theft of vehicles and firearms differently than other theft charges. Theft charges of a vehicle or firearm are both Class B felonies and the value of the vehicle or firearm does not matter.

Possession of Stolen Property

As long as the stolen property is not a vehicle or firearm, charges for Possession of Stolen Property are divided into 3 degrees of severity; specifically:

  1. Possession of Stolen Property 1st Degree;
  2. Possession of Stolen Property 2nd Degree; and
  3. Possession of Stolen Property 3rd Degree;
  1. Possession of Stolen Property 1st Degree is the most severe crime and is a Class B felony, which faces a maximum of 10 years in prison and $20,000 in fines.
    In order to be convicted of this charge, the prosecutor must prove you: (1) knowingly received, possessed, concealed, retain, or disposed of stolen property; (2) you knew the property was stolen; (3) you withheld or appropriated the property to the use of someone other than the true owner; (4) the value of the stolen property exceed $5,000.00; and (5) these acts occurred in the State of Washington.

  2. Possession of Stolen Property 2nd Degree is a Class C felony, which faces a maximum of 5 years of jail time and $10,000 fine.

    In order to be convicted of this charge, the prosecutor must prove you: (1) knowingly received, possessed, concealed, retain, or disposed of stolen property; (2) you knew the property was stolen; (3) you withheld or appropriated the property to the use of someone other than the true owner; (4) the value of the stolen property exceed $750.00, but was not more than $5,000.00; and (5) these acts occurred in the State of Washington.

  3. Possession of Stolen Property 3rd Degree is a gross misdemeanor, which faces a maximum of 364 days of jail time and $5,000 fine.

    In order to be convicted of this charge, the prosecutor must prove you: (1) knowingly received, possessed, concealed, retain, or disposed of stolen property; (2) you knew the property was stolen; (3) you withheld or appropriated the property to the use of someone other than the true owner; (4) the value of the stolen property did not exceed $750.00; and (5) these acts occurred in the State of Washington.

What Can You Loose From A Criminal Conviction

If you are convicted of a crime, you can suffer several consequences. Below is a list of just a few ways a conviction can negatively affect you:

Harm to your Reputation | Time in prison or jail | Large Fines | Loss of your right to carry or possess a firearm | Loss of your right to vote | Your assets can be seized | Permanent criminal record; and Immigration consequences.